News

Hole in roof reveals hole in insurance coverage

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Florida is number two when it comes to mortgage foreclosures, mortgage fraud probably ranks as high. 

Rosemary Toliver completed a mortgage modification in 2010 and was convinced she had crossed every 'T' and dotted every 'I.'  But a hole in her roof revealed that there's a hole in her loan modification plan.

"I don't have any insurance on the house," said Toliver.

The loan modification is with Walkhampton Capital Corporation, a Canadian investment company. And her documents show that she was paying for 'forced place hazard insurance.'

"I've been paying in my mortgage this insurance coverage," Toliver said.

Every month Toliver's paid $53 for insurance to cover damage to the building, but not her personal items.

"It is crazy, it is really crazy and I'm getting nowhere," said Toliver.

On Your Side: Checking an Officer's identification

CLAY COUNTY, Fla. -- First Coast News got an email from Joyce who said someone disguised as a police officer came to her door, demanding $6,000. She was afraid and eventually gave it to the man.

Captain Joe Bucci, with the Clay County Sheriff's Office, gave tangible information on how you can confirm whether or not someone that comes to your door is an Official Law Enforcement Officer.

According to Bucci:

1) Ask to see a badge and department identification. It'll have a photo with it.

2) Call the dispatch center when the person gives you a badge number to confirm who they are.

3) Ask for a supervisor with dispatch to triple check.

4) When in doubt, if you're not sure, take their information and confirm it inside your home while they wait outside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Valve Replacement Therapy Offers Alternative to Open Heart Surgery

JACKSONVILLE, FLA - A revolutionary new heart treatment is offering new hope to patients considered ineligible for open heart surgery or at great risk of suffering serious surgical complications.

Known as Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR), the minimally invasive procedure is now being used to treat patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis. One of the most common valve disease disorders, aortic stenosis typically results from aging, as calcium or scarring narrows and hardens the heart’s aortic valve. As blood flow through the valve becomes constricted, individuals may experience chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting and palpitations. For those with severe aortic stenosis, the condition can lead to congestive heart failure and even death.

Mother of slain Metro PCS worker fights for safety in workplace

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- What happened at the Main Street Metro PCS on July 20, 2013 has changed Darlene Farah's life forever.

"I go to the bathroom and lock myself in the bathroom and cry or either I go outside and cry," said Farah.

Farah's daughter, Shelby, was working in the retail shop when one of the suspects captured on security camera video, robbed the store then shot and killed her.

"For $103, my daughter lost her life. No cell phones were taken," said Farah, "$103 in ten seconds."

Farah, 46, said the brutal murder of her child has been overwhelming. 

"My kids don't want to go back to the house," she said, "Shelby will always be in our hearts, but I have two other kids to focus on."

She said children are also concerned about her safety.

Attorney calls Jacksonville 'Potholeville' and files suit

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Wilson Boulevard is heavily traveled. Its age is showing in some areas and now it is named in a lawsuit.

On March 4, 2013, Lori Lloyd was traveling west on Wilson. She was the passenger on a motorcycle.

"We were just driving along about 30 miles an hour," said Lloyd, "and he hit this dip and it was a big dip."

Lloyd said what happened next would change her life forever.

"It ejected me off the motorcycle and I landed in the center lane on my head and my shoulder," she said.

She's convinced if she wasn't wearing her helmet, she would be in a grave somewhere. Now, she's in court fighting the city over a road hazard that has left her injured. 

"I'm in pain everyday," she said, "I wake up and I have work my hands to get my fingers moving. These two are not going to move anymore, both of my shoulders hurt."

Your guide to First Coast 4th of July celebrations

Firework displays and events scheduled to celebrate the 4th of July holiday across the First Coast. Here's a list of the festivities:

Columbia County celebrates 4th of July

Clay County celebrates the 4th of July

Fernandina Beach celebrates 4th of July

Flagler County celebrates 4th of July

Sickle Cell Disease patients are being called 'drug seekers'

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Kiara Owens, 24, lives with pain 24 hours a day. She has Sickle Cell Disease.

"It is scary to realize that this illness one day is going to kill me," she said.

She also has to live with a stigma that affects when and how she gets her much needed medication.

"I have been labeled a drug seeker," said Owens.

Owens said given her unexpected bouts with excruciating pain, she has to go to an emergency room more than she wants to and then it becomes a problem.

"They won't give you the medicine because they fear you're addicted to narcotics," said Owens, "and you're just pretending to get that medicine."

The Florida State College at Jacksonville student said three years ago she went to an ER and was labeled a "Drug Seeker" and it has followed her since.